THE ZETETIC WEBSITE - PHOTOGRAPHS BY ALEXANDER BRATTELL

EXHIBITION:
PORTALS AND SPIRITS

page 1


Shown at
Upstairs at the Clerk's House
118 1/2 Shoreditch High Street
London E.1

15 April - 23 May 1999

Read the Press Release

Lighthouse,
East London
 

The fields from Islington to Marylebone, to Primrose Hill and Saint Johnís Wood, were builded over with pillars of gold, and there Jerusalemís pillars stood.

William Blake - Jerusalem, 1804

Buddha, E14  

The struggle for life is hard here, worse than elsewhere, because all these wretched people are without sensibility, without heart, attracted only by what is eccentric and odiously pretty. To get anywhere one must either wait for ages or prostitute oneís art.

Henri Gaudier-Brzeska - letter to Sophie Brzeska, 1913

Procession,
Royal Docks
 

London, says Francis Crossley, is Luan-Dun (Celtic), City of the Moon, and tradition says there was once a Temple of Diana (the moon) where St Pauls now stands. Greenwich he derives from Grian-Wich (City of the Sun) , also Celtic.

Brewers Dictionary of Phrase & Fable, 1894

State of Mind,
South Bank
 

There is one beautiful sight in the East End, and only one, and it is the children dancing in the street when the organ-grinder goes his ground. It is fascinating to watch them, the new born, the next generation, swaying and stepping, with pretty little mimicries and graceful inventions all their own, with muscles that move swiftly and easily, and bodies that leap airily, weaving rhythms never taught in dancing school.

Jack London - People Of The Abyss, 1903

Sacred Light, Bow  

At Noon, November 15, an alarming explosion occured somewhere near Fenchurch Street. No damage was done; no trace could be found of anything that had exploded. An hour later, near the Mansion House, which is not far from Fenchurch Street, occurred a still more violent explosion. The streets filled with persons who had run from buildings, and there was an investigation, but not a trace could be found of anything that had exploded.

London Morning Post, November 16 1895

Chaos of the Normal,
London Bridge
 

The first Paleolithic handaxe (c.20,000 B.C) ever recognized in Britain was discovered near what is now Kings Cross Rd in 1680. The axe lay buried alongside the remains of a straight tusked elephant. .

Chesca Potter - Mysterious Kings Cross, 1988

 

 


Portals and Spirits - page 2.


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